Sunday, November 07, 2010

James Polly Brown & Eunice Reasor (4G Grandparents)




Taken from


James (Polly) Brown

The Mormon Battalion
James (Polly) Brown and wife Eunice Reasor Brown
In 1846, President James K. Polk instructed Col. Stephen W. Kearney, the Commander of the Army of the West to enlist 500 Mormons for the purpose of assisting the U.S. Army in the Mexican war. Captain James Allen was ordered to go to the Mormon Camps in Iowa to recruit five companies of men with 75 to 100 men in each company. Captain Allen told the settlement of Mormons: “I have come among you, instructed by Col. S.F. Kearney of the U.S. Army, now commanding the Army of the West, to visit the Mormon camp, and to accept the service for twelve months of four or five companies of Mormon men who may be willing to serve their country for that period in our present war with Mexico; this force to unite with the Army of the West at Santa Fe, and be marched thence to California, where they will be discharged.”
“They will receive pay rations, and other allowances, such as other volunteers or regular soldiers receive, from the day they shall be mustered into the service, and will be entitled to all comforts and benefits of regular soldiers of the army, and when discharged as contemplated, at California, they will be given gratis their arms and accoutrements for which they will be fully equipped at Fort Leavenworth. This is offered to the Mormon people now. This is an opportunity of sending a portion of their young and intelligent men to the ultimate destination of their whole people, and entirely at the expense of the United States, and this advanced party can thus pave the way and look out for the land for their brethren to come after them. Those of the Mormons who are desirous of serving their country, on the conditions here enumerated, are requested to meet me without delay at their principal camp at Council Bluffs, whither I am going to consult with their principal men, and to receive and organize the force contemplated to be raised. I will receive all healthy, able-bodied men from eighteen to forty-five years of age.” J. Allen, Captain 1st Dragoons
These Mormons were destitute and had many reasons to refuse this enlistment request. The government had done nothing to protect them from the persecutions and mob actions that took place in Missouri and Illinois. There were hundreds of miles of land to cross that was filled with hostile Indians. How could they leave their families at a time like this to support a government that had so little regard for the protection of their families? However, at the encouragement and urging of President Brigham Young, over 500 men were finally mustered in at Council Bluffs, in Iowa on 16 July 1846. President Young told them it was their patriotic duty to join, and so they did. President Brigham Young said to them: “Brethren, you will be blessed, if you will live for those blessings which you have been taught to live for. The Mormon Battalion will be held in honorable remembrance to the latest generation; and I will prophesy that the children of those who have been in the army, in defense of their country, will grow up and bless their fathers for what they did at that time. And men and nations will rise up and bless the men who went in that Battalion. These are my feelings in brief respecting the company of men known as the Mormon Battalion. When you consider the blessings that are laid upon you, will you not live for them? As the Lord lives, if you will but live up to your privileges, you will never be forgotten, without end, but you will be had in honorable remembrance, for ever and ever.”
Twenty women were hired at private’s pay to do the laundry. In addition, some of the officers chose to take their families, wagons and possessions with them. The army was happy to accommodate them as this cost the government nothing. There were 15 or 16 families and 50 or more children who left Council Bluffs with the Battalion.
After a long march to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, in August the men were outfitted for the march, which included a musket or rifle, a bayonet, ammunition, knapsacks, haversacks, blankets and canteens, and specific training in the use of this equipment. They were also issued tents to be used by six men. There they also received the clothing allowance of $42.00 for the year which was mostly sent back to their families and friends in Council Bluffs. This became the longest military march in history. They traveled 2,000 miles from Council Bluffs, Iowa to San Diego, California.
Among these men was James (Polly) Brown and his wife Eunice Reasor Brown. James was a private in Company D, with Captain Nelson Higgins and 1st Lieutenant George Parker Dykes. James was born 22 Apr 1803 in Taylorville, Shelby/Spencer, Kentucky. He married Eunice Reasor who was born 4 Mar 1808 in Renbrely, Shelby, Kentucky. They had nine children. By 1851 the family was in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah. It was here in Manti that Eunice died on 18 Jul 1858. She is buried in the Manti City Cemetery along with two daughters, Sarah Jane Brown who married John Lowry, Jr., and Eunice Ann Brown who married Peter Mikkel Munk. Eunice’s grave is marked with a plaque stating that she was among the women who marched with the Mormon Battalion. The plaque was placed by the Daughters of Utah Pioneers.
James died 6 Nov 1871 in Rockville, Washington County, Utah, and was buried in the Rockville Cemetery in Washington County Utah. To view the diary of Zadock Knapp Judd of Company E. of the Mormon Battalion click on the link below. (Some data taken from Mormon Battalion website mormonbattalion.com)Diary of Zadock Knapp Judd



James Polly Brown (He apparently had 3 wives...I am related to Eunice Reasor)
Robert H. Brown (Eunice Pectol)
Rozina Brown
Joseph Parley Allred
Joseph Parley Allred
GPA
Mom
Me


James Polly Brown1,2 (M)b. 1804
James Polly Brown was a farmer.3 He was also known as James Polley Brown.1 He married Eunice Reasor. James Polly Brown was born in 1804 in Kentucky.3 He and Eunice Reasor lived in Manti, Sanpete, Deseret in 1851; value of real estate was $275.3 James Polly Brown was sealed to Sarah Jane Brown on 16 January 1889 in the St. George Temple, St. George, Washington, Utah.1 James Polly Brown was sealed to Mary Ann Brown on 16 January 1889 in the St. George Temple, St. George, Washington, Utah.1 James Polly Brown was sealed to Mary Ann Brown on 16 January 1889 in the Manti Temple, Manti, Sanpete, Utah.1 James Polly Brown was sealed to Eunice Ann Brown on 16 January 1889 in the St. George Temple, St. George, Washington, Utah.1
Children of James Polly Brown and Eunice Reasor
Newman Brown b. 18 Jul 1830, d. 6 Apr 18793Robert H. Brown b. 11 May 1832, d. 14 Mar 18773Sarah Jane Brown+ b. 27 Oct 1834, d. 25 Sep 19201Mary Ann Brown+ b. 2 Oct 1841, d. 15 Feb 19013Eunice Ann Brown+ b. 13 Mar 1851, d. 8 Mar 19363

Eunice Reasor1,2 (F)b. 1808
Eunice Reasor was also known as Eunice Resor.1 She was also known as Eunice Reeser.1 She was also known as Eunice Reecer.1 She married James Polly Brown. Eunice Reasor was born in 1808 in Kentucky.3 She and James Polly Brown lived in Manti, Sanpete, Deseret in 1851; value of real estate was $275.3 Eunice Reasor was sealed to Sarah Jane Brown on 16 January 1889 in the St. George Temple, St. George, Washington, Utah.1 Eunice Reasor was sealed to Mary Ann Brown on 16 January 1889 in the St. George Temple, St. George, Washington, Utah.1 Eunice Reasor was sealed to Mary Ann Brown on 16 January 1889 in the Manti Temple, Manti, Sanpete, Utah.1 Eunice Reasor was sealed to Eunice Ann Brown on 16 January 1889 in the St. George Temple, St. George, Washington, Utah.1

JAMES "POLLY" BROWN
James Brown and Eunice Reasor joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Indiana about 1842--the year their daughter Mary Ann was born. In 1844, they moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, where they were endowed in the Nauvoo LDS temple in February 1846. At Council Bluffs, Iowa, James joined the Mormon Battalion and was mustered into Company "D". Eunice was allowed to accompany them as a launderess. Thus the entire family, including four year old Mary Ann, became part of the battalion. In September, the Browns were among those detached and sent to Pueblo, Colorado to prepare winter shelter for the sick members of the battalion. In May 1847 they left for Utah, arriving in the Salt Lake Valley on 29 July 1847, just five days after Brigham Young and the first pioneers.
The Browns were called to help settle Manti, Utah, in 1849, and built a dugout on the south side of the hill where the Manti LDS temple now stands. While in Manti, James entered into plural marriage and Eunice died. In 1861, Pres. Young called James "Polly" Brown to help settle Utah's "Dixie," and he moved his family to Rockville, Utah.

Snippet from a blog:

One such person from June's family was Eunice Reazor Brown who went with her 9 children and her husband James Polly Brown on the long march to fight a war ...
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This excerpt is from the Autobiography of James S. Brown "Life of a Pioneer."

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Awesome summary of Eunice Reasor Brown's life at Find A Grave:
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=31048941
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Birth: Mar. 4, 1808
Shelby County
Kentucky, USA
Death: Jul. 18, 1858
Manti
Sanpete County
Utah, USA

Daughter of Frederick Reasor & Sarah Kester

Married James Polly Brown, 13 Apr 1826, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona

Eunice Reasor Brown was born on March 4, 1808 in Shelby County, Kentucky. Her parents were Fredrick Reasor and Sarah Hester. On April 13, 1826, Eunice Reasor was married to James "P" Brown, a son of Robert Brown and Margaret Polly. Their marriage took place in Floyd County, Indiana, with her father, a Baptist Minister, officiation. To this union were born eight children. William, the eldest son, was the first to accept the Gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. William was also instrumental in converting the other members of his family. He died in 1845.
In the spring of 1843, the family moved from Fredicktown, Missouri. Their second son Fredrick, who was born in 1828, died in November of 1843. In the same year the family moved to Macoupin County, Illinois, and then to Nauvoo to be with members of the Church. They were among the many to endure the persecutions of the Saints. One incident recorded was about a precious feather bed which Eunice refused to leave when the Saints were driven out of Nauvoo. She clung to it and said. "If I can't take it with me, I will open it and let the feathers fly." Later on she sold the bed for an ox to replace a tender-footed one. She also had foresight to provide herself with several dresses before she made the trek across the plains.
When James "P" and Eunice Brown reached Council Bluffs, the call came for volunteers to join the Mormon Battalion. James "P" Brown enlisted in Company D as a private. After reaching Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, James found that he could bring his family with him and sent for them. The family had two teams, two yoke of young oxen, three cows, and a tent. Newman, age 16, and Robert age 14, drove the teams, and Sarah Jane, age 12, had the duty of driving the three cows. The wagons were placed at the rear so Sarah Jane would be near her family while tending the cattle. She often remarked: "The Battalion followed the flag and I followed the dust." It has been reported that Alma, age 6, and Mary Ann, age 4, went along to. Alma Shroch (or Shrock) was an Indian boy that James had bought from Navajo Indians for $25.00. He was regarded and treated as if he were one of their own children.
When the family reached Fort Leavenworth, Robert, their son and one of the teamsters, was ill. His father was permitted to drive the team. The James "P" Brown family was among the group that went with the Higgins Detachment in September of 1846 to Pueblo, Colorado. As they left, Sarah Jane felt a sense of loneliness. She would miss the security of so many people. Her father was one of the men who assisted Captain Higgins in bringing the group to Pueblo. (Tyler, 158).
On the way to Pueblo, the company came upon an Arapaho Indian village. The group was somewhat frightened. The Indian chief teated them with kindness, and led them to a good place to camp. Sarah Jane was sitting by her mother in the wagon when the chief passed by. He wanted Sarah Jane to ride with him on his horse. Eunice refused to allow her to accept the ride and it was decided that a guard was to be on duty that night. There were many prayers offered in behalf of the safety of the group. When the family reached Pueblo, they camped by the Mississippi Saints who were already there. They built their log houses between the homes of the Mississippi Saints.
In November of 1846, Eunice, James and their family were to see the second detachment of women, children, and the sick soldiers come to Pueblo. All the women except five and some children had been sent to Pueblo. After Captain James Brown brought them to Pueblo, he left again. In the spring he returned with some of the soldiers' pay, and also had orders that the group at Pueblo was to leave under his leadership to Ft. Laramie, Wyoming. On the route to Ft. Laramie, Eunice gave birth on June 2nd to a baby boy whom they named John Taylor Brown.
The company arrived in Salt Lake Valley on July 29, 1847. At this time, the Battalion members were released from their service duty. Their year of enlistment had expired. Under the leadership of Isaac Morley, the Brown family moved to Manti to help settle the area. Their first home was on the south side of the hill which is the present site of the Manti temple. Another child, Eunice Ann, was born on March 13, 1851. During this period of time, the families encountered many Indian skirmishes.
Eunice Brown died July 28, 1858 in Manti, Utah. She is buried in the Manti City Cemetery. When Sarah Jane was seventeen, she married John Lowery, and eventually became the mother of nine children. She was devoted Church member and worked in the Manti temple. She died in October of 1920, and was buried in the Manti Cemetery.
Mary Ann was four when her parents joined in the Battalion. She married Archibald Waller Overton Buchanan. Mary Ann died in February of 1901 in Glenwood, Utah.
Source:
Lyman, Amy Brown, Pres. "Women of The Mormon Battalion."
from Women of the Mormon Battalion
Compiled and edited by Carl V. Larson and Shirley N. Maynes
keyed to digital by Renda Taylor Feb 2005




James (Polly) Brown and his wife Eunice Reasor Brown. James was a private in Company D, with Captain Nelson Higgins and 1st Lieutenant George Parker Dykes. He married Eunice Reasor who was born 4 Mar 1808 in Renbrely, Shelby, Kentucky. They had nine children. By 1851 the family was in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah. It was here in Manti that Eunice died on 18 Jul 1858. She is buried in the Manti City Cemetery along with two daughters, Sarah Jane Brown who married John Lowry, Jr., and Eunice Ann Brown who married Peter Mikkel Munk. Eunice's grave is marked with a plaque stating that she was among the women who marched with the Mormon Battalion. The plaque was placed by the Daughters of Utah Pioneers.



Family links:
 Spouse:
  James Polly Brown (1803 - 1871)*

 Children:
  William Ferguson Brown (1827 - 1845)*
  Frederick Reasor Brown (1828 - 1843)*
  Neuman Brown (1830 - 1879)*
  Robert H. Brown (1832 - 1877)*
  Mary Ann Brown Buchanan (1842 - 1901)*
  John Taylor Brown (1847 - 1849)*
  Eunice Ann Brown Munk (1850 - 1936)*

*Calculated relationship
Burial:
Manti Cemetery
Manti
Sanpete County
Utah, USA
Created by: Schott Family
Record added: Nov 01, 2008 
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Link to Mormon Battalion Information:
http://www.orsonprattbrown.com/MormonBattalion/sick-detachment-roster.html
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http://pioneerheritagecenter.org/drupal-6.17//?q=BROWN,_JAMES_POLLY
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A very fun story about Eunice Reasor...It is the story called "The White Woman."
http://sanpete.com/downloads/saga/Saga_of_the_Sanpitch_16.pdf
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An interesting story about Sarah Jane (their daughter)
http://sanpete.com/downloads/saga/Saga_of_the_Sanpitch_19.pdf
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Interesting story about them buying an Indian boy: THE INDIAN, ALMA “SHOCK” BROWN...there is another story about the James Polly Brown family in the same pamphlet "MY GRANDPARENTS"

http://sanpete.com/downloads/saga/Saga_of_the_Sanpitch_27.pdf
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2 Comments:

Blogger Stephanie said...

Thank you for your blog about James "Polly" Brown. He is an ancestor of mine as well.
James "Polly" Brown
Sarah Jane Brown Lowry
Ida May Lowry Allen
Marjorie Allen
Allen Jones
Stephanie J. Elmer

4/11/2011 1:37 PM  
Blogger PsychDoctor said...

I visited his grave in Rockville today...sad little cemetery, but amazing view. He is located in the northeast corner of the cemetery...

1/13/2012 9:48 PM  

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