Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Dimick Baker Huntington & Fannie Maria Allen (4G grandparents)


HUNTINGTON, Dimick Baker (1808-1879), shoemaker, constable, Indian interpreter, blacksmith; born at Watertown, Jefferson County New York. Married Fannie Maria Allen, 1830. Converted to Mormonism, 1835. Constable at Far West, Missouri. Coroner and constable at Nauvoo, Illinois. Among those arrested for destruction of the NauvooExpositor, 1844. Enlisted with the Mormon Battalion in the Mexican War. Arrived in Salt Lake Valley in 1847. Helped establish settlements in Utah and Sanpete counties. Accompanied Parley Pratt on exploring expedition to southern Utah, 1850. Participated in Indian fights at Battle Creek and Provo; served as interpreter among Great Basin Indians. Died in Salt Lake City. [PJSv2]

From Wikipedia




Dimick Baker Huntington (May 26, 1808 – February 1, 1879) was a leading Indian interpreter in early Utah Territory. He also commissioned the Church History Panorama of C. C. A. Christensen to use in his presentations of the gospel to the Native Americans.[1]


Huntington was the son of William and Zina Baker Huntington. He was born at Watertown, Jefferson County, New York. Huntington married Fanny Marie Allen in 1830, they eventually had seven children. Huntington joined the Church of the Latter Day Saints in 1835, the same year as his parents.

Huntington first enters the annals of Mormon history as the first to see Joseph Smith land in Illinois after his escape from jail in Missouri.[2]Huntington also took Smith the four miles distance to the house where Emma Smith was staying. In March 1841, Huntington was appointed one of the constables of Nauvoo, Illinois.[3] In October 1841, Huntington brought the testimony that led to the excommunication of John A. Hicks, the elders quorum president in Nauvoo, for falsehood and schismatic conversation.[4]

In 1842, Huntington was made coroner of Nauvoo.[5] After Joseph Smith's death, Huntington was among those who prepared Joseph andHyrum Smith's bodies for burial and buried them in a secret location underneath the Nauvoo House.[6]

Huntington was a member of the Mormon Battalion. His family had come with him and they went to Pueblo, Colorado. One of Fanny's children was born there on January 1, 1847.

Huntington was one of the members of Parley P. Pratt's company that explored southern Utah in 1849.[7] Huntington was also among the first settlers of Provo, Utah.

Huntington was the first Indian interpreter in Utah Territory. In 1855, he negotiated a peace with the Utes in the vicinity of Fillmore, Utah.[8]

In 1857, Huntington was closely associated with teaching the gospel to many Native Americans, and kept a journal of his activities. Among other things he recorded Brigham Youngordaining Tutsegabit and elder on September 10, 1857.[9] In 1868, Huntington was among those who negotiated the end of Utah's Black Hawk War.

In 1874, Huntington ordained Kanosh an elder in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[10]

Huntington worked as a blacksmith and was also drum-major of the Nauvoo Legion band. He later held a similar position with a band in Salt Lake City.

For the last several years of his life, Huntington served as patriarch of the Salt Lake Stake.
Birth: May 20, 1808WatertownJefferson CountyNew York, USA Death: Feb. 1, 1879Salt Lake CitySalt Lake CountyUtah, USA Son of William Huntington and Zina BakerMarried Susan Maria Cardin, 18 May 1823Married Fannie Maria Allen, 28 Apr 1830, Watertown, Jefferson, New York Married Ellen Sophia Jacobs, 9 Apr 1851 Married Harriet Augusta Hoagland, 18 Jan 1871, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Married Tesidge UintahEarly in life Dimick learned the shoemaking and blacksmithing trades and became very useful in the communities where he lived because of his skill. On April 28, 1830, he married Fanny Maria Allen. They became the parents of seven children.In 1835 Dimick joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and from that year on his life was linked with the intimate history of its founder, Joseph Smith. Dimick moved his family to Kirtland, Ohio, then to Missouri, later to Far West, then to Nauvoo, Illinois. He was a constable and bodyguard to Joseph Smith. After the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum Smith, Dimick was one of those who bore the remains to their earthly resting place.The exodus of February, 1846, from Nauvoo took place under the most trying experiences. Dimick fled from the mob with others and hastened to the Missouri River. When the Mormon Battalion was mustered into service, Dimick became a soldier in its ranks. He was in Company "D," and besides performing the duties of a soldier, served in the capacity of blacksmith. At Santa Fe he was detached with others from the Battalion and sent to Pueblo. His wife, who had accompanied him on the march, bore him a child on January 1st, 1847, at Pueblo, an Indian squaw acting as midwife. Unfortunately, the child died shortly after birth, This group arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, under Captain Brown, about the time their enlistment expired.He wrote: "Through all my travels in the Battalion, to Pueblo, back to Laramie and on to Salt Lake Valley, I carried in my wagon a bushel of wheat, and during the winter of '47 slept with it under my bed, keeping it for seed. For three months my family tasted no bread. We dug thistle roots and other native growths and had some poor beef, with a little milk, but no butter. Early in the spring of '48 I rode one hundred and fifteen miles to Fort Bridger and bought a quart of little potatoes about the size of pigeon eggs, at twenty-five cents each. From these I raised that year about a bushel of potatoes, but ate none of them. I planted them in 1849 and have had plenty of potatoes ever since."From his early association with the Indians he felt a kinship with them. He readily learned their language and dialects, and this talent easily placed him as one of the best interpreters in the west. He first lived in the "Old Fort," but in 1850 was called to the Provo and Sanpete vallies to help establish colonies, where he was recognized as the Indians' friend. It is said that some of their tribe were always at his table. His presence was necessary at all meetings between the settlers and the savages. He was in the first fight with the Indians at Battle Creek, March 5, 1849, and took command in the absence of the colonel. He was also in the Indian fight at Provo, with his two sons, Allen and Lot. He accompanied Parley Pratt's exploring expedition to Iron County in 1850, and in 1853, at the close of the Walker war, was sent by Governor Young to arrange a treaty of peace with Chief Walker. He wrote, "I acted as master of ceremonies at a grand treaty between the Utes and Shoshones at Salt Lake City in 1854, and fed both tribes at my table. That treaty was never broken."After Captain Gunnison's massacre, Brigham Young was anxious to recover the body of Captain Gunnison to forward it to his family. He accordingly sent Dimick B. Huntington to the scene of the tragedy, with instructions to report to Captain Morris and render him all possible aid. Mr. Huntington was requested to hire Kanosh, the Pauvan chief, and other friendly Indians, to go with him to the Pauvans on the Sevier for the especial purpose of recovering the lost property belonging to the government. He started south on November 1st, met Captain Morris and his party at Nephi, who were on their way to Salt Lake City. They gave him a guide and he proceeded southward, and on the following day reached Fillmore, where he met Kanosh and Parashont, two of the Pauvan chiefs. They had already recovered the stolen notes of the surveying party, its instruments, excepting an odometer, and had brought them to President Call. The scene of the massacre was next visited, and the scattered bones gathered and buried, most of them where they lay. Those of Captain Gunnison and the guide Potter were interred at Fillmore. Dimick Huntington gave invaluable service to the government at this time.When Brigham Young and the Indian chiefs met at Spanish Fork Indian Reservation Farm, in June, 1865, Dimick was the interpreter, and the Indians made a treaty with the whites wherein the red men were to go to the Uintah Valley within a year. On May 10, 1854, Dimick and George Bean were nominated and sustained as interpreters for missionaries going to the Sandwich Islands. These men were part of the escort to the coast from Salt Lake City.When not among the Indians, trading and interpreting and exploring the valleys for possible future colonization, he followed his vocation of blacksmith. However, he had another interest that brought joy to countless hundreds. He loved music to such an extent that he promoted its cultivation wherever he went. He made drums, founded musical schools, and was drum-major of the old-time martial band named in his honor, "Dimick's Band."In the Church he held the office of Elder and later High Priest, and for many years was a Patriarch of the Salt Lake Stake of Zion. He was the husband of two women and the father of nine children. When he died, February 1, 1879, at the age of seventy-one years, there passed from view a soldier, a friend to the red man, a rugged scout and explorer, a man of musical talent, and a soul who was utterly fearless under gunfire or peril from man or the elements. — (Ilene Hanks Kingsbury.)Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol. 6, p. 432
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Excerpt from Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah
"Davis Hunter...In company with Dimick B. Huntington secured the body, papers, etc., of Lieutenant Gunnison after he was killed by the Indians in southern Utah."
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Dimick's Wife and children marched with Company D of the Mormon Battalion.  (Fanny Maria Allen, wife of Dimick B. Huntington. Martha Zina, Betsy Prescinda, Clark Allen, Lot (Children)).
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Person Sheet

NameFannie Marie ALLEN, F
Birth Date26 Oct 1810
Birth PlaceLorraine, Jefferson, New York, United States
Death Date14 Dec 1894
Death PlacePleasant Green, Salt Lake, Utah Territery
Spouses
1Dimick Baker HUNTINGTON, M
Birth Date20 May 1808
Birth PlaceWatertown, Jefferson, New York, United States
Death Date1 Feb 1879
Death PlaceSalt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Burial Date4 Feb 1879
Burial PlaceSalt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Territory
FlagsNauvoo Resident, Utah Pioneer

FatherWilliam HUNTINGTON , M (1784-1846)
MotherZina BAKER , F (1786-1839)
Marr Date28 Apr 1830
Marr PlaceWatertown, Jefferson, New York, United States
ChildrenClark Allen , M (1831-1896)
Lot Elisha , M (1834-1862)
Maryette , F (1836-1839)
Fanny Marie , F (1838-1842)
Martha Zina , F (1844-1882)
Betsy Prescindia , F (1846-1846)
Julia Carolina , F (1848-1925)
Sarah Adeline , F (1851-1856)
Joseph Smith , M (1855-1907)
Notes for Dimick Baker (Spouse 1)
The original settlement at Provo (Fort Utah) was established March 12, 1849 President John S. Higbee, with Isaac Higbee and Dimick B. Huntington, counselors, and about 30 families or 150 persons sent from Salt Lake City by President Brigham Young. Several log houses were erected, surrounded by a 14 foot palisade 20 by 40 rods in size, with gates in the east and west ends, and a middle deck, for a cannon. The fort was first located west of town, but was moved to Sowiette Park in April, 1850.
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Name: Huntington, Dimick Baker
Birth Date: 26 May 1808
Birth Place: Watertown, Jefferson, New York
Death Date: 1 February 1879
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
Father: Huntington, William
Mother: Baker, Zina
Spouse: Allen, Fannie Maria
Marriage Date: 28 April 1830

Comments: Dimick was the high constable and collector for the Nauvoo Legion, being commissioned in March 1841. He was elected coroner of Nauvoo on 23 May 1842. He resided in the Nauvoo 4th Ward and participated in the burial of Joseph Smith in the cellar of the unfinished Nauvoo House on 29 June 1844. He was endowed on 20 January 1846 in the Nauvoo Temple. He was a soldier in the Nauvoo Legion. He was a private in Company D of the Mormon Battalion.

Sources: David D. Yearsley Ledger, p. 28; Smith, History of the Church, 5:18; "Law of the Lord" and Consecration Accounts, p. 60; Joseph Smith Ledger, Book A, p. 118 (March 1842-September 1842); Hancock County Taxes, 1842, p. 231; Nauvoo House Ledger, Book A, p. 37; Nauvoo House Ledger, Book B, p. 73; Temple Committee Ledger, Book A, p. 28; Temple Committee Place Book, p. 9; Nauvoo LDS Census, 1842, p. 47; Nauvoo City Treasury, p. 53; Ancestral File; Rowena Miller Files, Lands and Records Office, Nauvoo Restoration, Inc.; Black, Membership of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830-1848, 24:752-57; Black and Black, Annotated Record of Baptisms for the Dead, 1840-1845, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, 3:1852-53.

Grantor: Joseph Smith, sole trustee-in-trust, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Residence: Hancock County, Illinois
Grantee: Dimick B. Huntington
Residence: Hancock County, Illinois
Transaction Date: 7 March 1843
Considerations: $200.00
Town Parcel: East/2 Lot #1, Block #161, Nauvoo Plat, Town of Nauvoo
Acknowledged: 20 March 1843, Robert D. Foster, Justice of the Peace, Hancock County, Illinois
Sources:Hancock County Deeds, book N page #45-46 entry #6476 (16 October 1844); Nauvoo Municipal Court, book A page #219 entry #200 (16 August 1843)

Grantor:Dimick B. Huntington and Fanny Maria, wife
Residence: Hancock County, Illinois
Grantee: William Nesbitt
Residence: Hancock County, Illinois
Transaction Date: 25 September 1843
Considerations: $50.00
Town Parcel: Lot #1, Block #161, Nauvoo Plat, Town of Nauvoo
Legal Description: Commence Southeast corner of East/2 of Lot 1 at Northeast corner of said Lot; running South 5 Rods and 10 links to Northeast corner of said tract; the West 30 feet; South to River; East to West line Durphy Street; North to beginning.
Acknowledged: 2 October 1843, Isaac Higbee, Justice of the Peace, Hancock County, Illinois
Source: Hancock County Deeds, book N page #46 entry #6477 (16 October 1844)

Grantor:Dimick B. Huntington
Residence: Hancock County, Illinois
Grantee: Trustees
Transaction Date: 1846
Considerations: Paid
Town Parcel: Lot #1, Block #161, Nauvoo Plat, Town of Nauvoo

Grantor:Dimick B. Huntington and Fanny Maria, wife
Residence: Hancock County, Illinois
Grantee: William T. Dazey (Daisey)
Residence: Adams County, Illinois
Transaction Date: 9 May 1846
Considerations: $100.00
Town Parcel: East/2 Lot #1, Block #161, Nauvoo Plat, Town of Nauvoo
Legal Description: Beginning Northeast corner Lot 1; also corner of Durfee and Lumber Streets; South 90 feet; West 30 feet; South to Mississippi River; thence up the river 58 feet; North to Lumber Street; East to beginning.
Acknowledged: 9 May 1846, Isaac Higbee, Justice of the Peace, Hancock County, Illinois
Source: Hancock County Deeds, book P page #529 entry #8578 (9 June 1846)

Description
This database is a collection of abstracts of property transactions in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, and Surrounding Communities, 1839-1859. Where it was known, additional information (besides that included in the land transaction) was included about the parties.

Bibliography
Compiled by Susan Easton Black.
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Dimick B. Huntington
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dimick Baker Huntington (May 26, 1808 – February 1, 1879) was a leading Indian interpreter in early Utah Territory. He also commissioned the Church History Panorama of C. C. A. Christensen to use in his presentations of the gospel to the Native Americans.[1]

Huntington was the son of William and Zina Baker Huntington. He was born at Watertown, Jefferson County, New York. Huntington married Fanny Marie Allen in 1830, they eventually had seven children. Huntington joined the Church of the Latter Day Saints in 1835, the same year as his parents.

Huntington first enters the annals of Mormon history as the first to see Joseph Smith land in Illinois after his escape from jail in Missouri.[2] Huntington also took Smith the four miles distance to the house where Emma Smith was staying. In March 1841, Huntington was appointed one of the constables of Nauvoo, Illinois.[3] In October 1841, Huntington brought the testimony that led to the excommunication of John A. Hicks, the elders quorum president in Nauvoo, for falsehood and schismatic conversation.[4]

In 1842, Huntington was made coroner of Nauvoo.[5] After Joseph Smith's death, Huntington was among those who prepared Joseph and Hyrum Smith's bodies for burial and buried them in a secret location underneath the Nauvoo House.[6]

Huntington was a member of the Mormon Battalion. His family had come with him and they went to Pueblo, Colorado. One of Fanny's children was born there on January 1, 1847.

Huntington was one of the members of Parley P. Pratt's company that explored southern Utah in 1849.[7] Huntington was also among the first settlers of Provo, Utah.

Huntington was the first Indian interpreter in Utah Territory. In 1855, he negotiated a peace with the Utes in the vicinity of Fillmore, Utah.[8]

In 1857, Huntington was closely associated with teaching the gospel to many Native Americans, and kept a journal of his activities. Among other things he recorded Brigham Young ordaining Tutsegabit and elder on September 10, 1857.[9] In 1868, Huntington was among those who negotiated the end of Utah's Black Hawk War.

In 1874, Huntington ordained Kanosh an elder in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[10]

Huntington worked as a blacksmith and was also drum-major of the Nauvoo Legion band. He later held a similar position with a band in Salt Lake City.

For the last several years of his life, Huntington served as patriarch of the Salt Lake Stake.
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DIMICK BAKER HUNTINGTON:

Born May 26, 1808, in Watertown, N. Y.; married in 1830, in Watertown, N. Y., Fanny Maria, daughter of Gen. Clark Allen, (descendant of Ethan Allen) and Martha (Thompson) Allen. She was born October 26, 1810, in Loraine, N. Y., and died December 14, 1894, in Pleasant Green, Utah. She accompanied her husband in the famous Mormon Battalion march through the deserts, enduring all the hardships of a soldier's life. She was for four months without tasting bread, before her daughter Betsy Presendia was born, living on roots. When the girl was born at Pueblo, on Mexican Territory, she had no mid-wife or doctor, so an Indian squaw attended her. He married a second wife, about 1853, in Salt Lake City, Ellen Sophia Jacobson. She was born in Norway, about 1826, and died in Parowan, Utah, about 1900.

He was Indian interpreter for the U. S. Government up to the time of his death, which occurred February 1, 1879, in Salt Lake City. He was a private in Co. D of the Mormon Battalion, and as such took part in the Mexican War in 1846. He enlisted July 16, 1846, and was discharged July 16, 1847. He was a member of the Salt Lake City Council in the early days. He was High Priest in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was instrumental in helping to settle and colonize the whole region south of Salt Lake City, down to St. George on the South border of the Territory. He acted as interpreter for the Indians, as a soldier of the Mormon Battalion, and he helped to secure California, Nevada, and Utah, for the U. S. He published three books for the benefit of the Snakes and Utes, (Indians.) See page 209, Vol. IV., History of Utah, by Orson F. Whitney; also History of the Mormon Battalion, by Daniel Tyler.

Source: THE HUNTINGTON FAMILY IN AMERICA A Genealogical Memoir of the Known Descendants of SIMON HUNTINGTON FROM 1633 to 1915. PUBLISHED BY THE HUNTINGTON FAMILY ASSOCIATION HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 1915, PRESS OF THE HARTFORD PRINTING CO., (ELIHU GEER SONS,) 16 STATE STREET, HARTFORD, CONN
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Obituary

John Taylor, February 2nd, 1879
REMARKS MADE BY PRESIDENT JOHN TAYLOR,
At the Funeral Services of Brother Dimick B. Huntington, in the 16th Ward Meeting House, Salt Lake City, on Sunday Morning, February 2nd, 1879. (Reported by Geo. F. Gibbs.)

Journal of Discourses, Vol. 20, p. 138 - 142, John Taylor, February 2nd, 1879

There are a great many things associated with human existence that call upon people to reflect. We came into the world, and people are coming into it in a continuous stream--children are being born as all of us were in our turn; and whilst some are coming into the world giving pleasure to their parents and friends, there are trials, anxieties, cares and perplexities attending to the nurture of the babe and the care of youth until they arrive at years of maturity. Then comes the struggles of life with all its attendant cares and responsibilities.

With us particularly the greatest thing that we think of associated with the welfare of our youth is that they become acquainted with the principles of truth, with the order and organization of the kingdom of God, that they comprehend in some measure the laws of life and prepare to live for the future that is before them.

Brother Huntington has lived a great length of time associated with this church and kingdom, and has arrived to what is often termed "the sere and yellow leaf," when it is expected, according to the common course of humanity, that people must leave and go into another state of existence. For quite a long time it has been known by his more intimate friends that he was shortly to leave. I visited him not long ago myself, and had a very pleasant interview with him, and since then I never thought of his living long; in fact I expected to attend his funeral as we are now doing. But there was no compunction of feeling--no desire to continue to live; but he felt as though he had accomplished the work that was assigned him. Speaking to him, as I sometimes do to our aged brethren on some occasions, I said, "Well, Brother Dimick, you are about leaving, and, when you, go carry my best respects to our friends who are already there, and tell them I will continue to do the best I can in the hope of by and by meeting with them." And that is about the way that I look at these things. We have our entries into the world, our struggles in the world, and when we get through with these, and the weary wheels of life stand still, then we pass into another state of existence. The Gospel has revealed to us some of the most glorious, exalting, ennobling and encouraging principles; and when we are in possession of these principles and the feelings they produce, there is no terror in the approach of death. I have seen the time myself when I could have died just as easy as not if my time had come, and would just as soon have done so as not, and I do not feel much otherwise to-day.

There is something very interesting in all the affairs of human life, especially is there associated with us as a people. Brother Huntington has been with us for a great many years, and has passed through many trying scenes with the church in Missouri and elsewhere, and while they are not of the most pleasant nature to contemplate, at the same time they serve to show the faithfulness and integrity of those who have been associated with them. I see around me a good many of the brethren who, by experience, know all about these things, and I see too that their hair, like mine, is getting--I will not call it gray, but a little white. Some people felt sorry for us when enduring these things, but we did not feel sorry for ourselves, nor do we to-day. Some felt as though it was impossible to bear up under the continued struggles that we had to pass through; but the Latter-day Saints had no such feelings. They reflected upon the future and upon those great principles of eternal life which God has given unto them, and these thoughts stimulate us with hope and joy today; and as the effervescent affairs of time slide and pass away the Saints of God rejoice in the knowledge that an inheritance which is incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away, is reserved in the heavens for them. And they feel also that they have been called, and chosen, and elected by the Almighty to help to establish his kingdom on the earth, to introduce among men those principles that exist in the eternal worlds and to maintain them by the Spirit, the power and strength of the living God. They feel that they have a work to perform, and doing that work they realize that God is with them and that all will be right, whether it relates to this world or the world to come; that is the feeling which the Gospel of the Son of God inspires in the hearts of those who live up to its requirements, obey its demands, and fulfil the various duties devolving upon them.

It is not with them simply a personal matter. The Latter-day Saints feel as though they occupy a peculiar position in the world --that God has selected them from among the nations of the earth and gathered them together that he might place his name among them; and that in the coming struggle, in the great revolutions that shall transpire upon the face of the earth, it will be for them to manage, to direct, to control and adjust, and under the influence and guidance of the Spirit of the living God, to promulgate the principles of eternal truth to all people, that all mankind may have the opportunity of listening to the great and glorious principles that God has revealed to them, that they may be inducted into the laws of life and comprehend the principles of truth as they exist in the bosom of God; and holding the priesthood in all its various forms, organizations and powers, they feel that they are associated with the priesthood on the other side of the vail, who are interested in their welfare, in the progress of the work in which they are engaged, and in the accomplishment of the purpose which God has designed from before the commencement of the world. This is the kind of feeling that the Latter-day Saints are inspired with who comprehend their true position. And hence there are organizations of High Priests, Seventies, Elders and others, whose duty it is to go to nations of the earth to proclaim to all peoples the glad tidings of salvation. And whilst men ignorantly, and without knowledge, seek to persecute, proscribe and interfere with the rights of Israel, the God of Israel stands forth as their defender and will protect them under all circumstances, and every arm that is raised against them will fall, and every power that is marshalled against them will crumble to pieces, for he will assuredly take care of his people, and protect them in every emergency.

And when we comprehend these things, we realize that we are here not to do our will, but the will of the Father who sent us. We are here to introduce those eternal principles that exist in the bosom of the Almighty; we are here to build up the Church and kingdom of God upon the earth, and to form a nucleus through which and by which the God of heaven can work, operate, lead, dictate, and control the affairs of all men. He has introduced a little leaven which will by and by leaven the whole lump. And although wars, commotions, troubles, difficulties, bloodshed, plagues, pestilence and famine will stalk over the earth, the nations totter and fall, thrones be cast down and the powers of the earth be shaken, yet God will protect Israel, he will maintain his people, if they will cleave to him and obey his laws and keep his commandments; and we are here to introduce and establish these heavenly principles that exist with God, and to teach the principles of life to the people, that all mankind may have the opportunity of hearing and knowing of the great things that God has revealed for the salvation of the human family. We are here, then, for the accomplishment of these things. We are here not only to proclaim salvation to the living, not only to introduce the principles of law, and government, and religion, and everything calculated to exalt and ennoble man upon the earth, until the kingdoms of this earth shall grow and increase, and become the kingdoms of our God and his Christ, but we are here also to redeem the dead, to build temples and administer therein and to accomplish all the various works that God requires us as his servants to attend to. And when one after another of our friends passes away, what of it? It is only the ordinary course of nature, and it makes very little difference whether a man be on this side of the vail or on the other. Brother Dimick has gone where paralysis cannot strike him any more, where sorrow and sighing with him are passed, and where everything is pleasant, joyous and happifying, and where he can rejoice with his brethern who have gone before him. Do we feel to sorrow because of the change? No, not in the least. We feel about this as you, my brethren and sisters, did in years gone by, when leaving your friends and, perhaps families, to gather to Zion, and as your friends did in seeing you take your departure. They would shake you heartily by the hand and say: "Well, I am sorry you are going and yet I am glad, and I will try to follow you as soon as I can." That is about the feeling. It is an ordeal that God has placed upon all men, and we have got to meet it, and having met it, like all other things, we are prepared for what follows.

But let us speak of the living, for it is with those actualities we have now to do in relation to things that are transpiring. Sometimes people will say, "Don't you feel a little scared about things now?" referring to inimical legislation. No much; at least I do not. I do not know that it makes my knees tremble much. I feel as pleasant, joyous, comfortably and happy to-day as at any other time; all is right. Men cannot do as they please. God rules in the heavens; and the Prophet has said, "Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee, and the remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain." It is His duty to take care of His Saints, and why need we trouble much about it? We have children, and it is our duty to take care of them; and it appears that they are not much concerned where their dinner or their clothes come from; the believe that "daddy" will take care of that.

As regards brother Dimick, it is all right with him. I would say to him, "Peace to his ashes," and I would say to his family and friends, "Be comforted, peace be multiplied to you, and have confidence in God and all will be right." And by and by you will pass along, and we will come and see you if you do not come and see us; that is, we will bury you if you do not bury us first. And by and by we will all be on the other side of Jordan, singing "Hallelujah, hallelujah, the Lord God Omnipotent reigneth."

Let us seek to do right. That is the main thing for us Saints to do. I do not fear the world, nor any of its affairs or influences, or powers, or any of its intrigues, nor anything it can devise; for God will take care of his people if they do right. The only fear that I have is, that people will forsake their God, and lose faith in him and his promises, and be found serving the evil one instead of serving the Lord. If we fear God and keep his commandments, live our religion, and pursue a proper course, all will be well with us in time and through eternity.

Brother Huntington for many years was associated with the High Council; he has gone now to associate with the councils above, and with the various organizations of priesthood that are eternal, endless and everlasting. And we, by and by, will follow to join our quorums, our friends and associates who have gone before.

I am reminded of an item in Brother Dimick's written request, desiring that only his good deeds should be spoken of at his funeral, and also of a remark by Brother Taylor, in referring to it, that we should not speak anything but good of our friends whether living or dead. I am really astonished sometimes to witness the hard feelings and rancor that exist among men. They come--I do not know where they come from; yes, I do too, they come from beneath. The fruits of the Spirit of God are love, peace, joy, gentleness, long-suffering, kindness, affection, and everything that is good and amiable. The fruits of the spirit of the devil are envy, hatred, malice, irritableness, everything that tends to destroy mankind, and to make them feel uncomfortable and unhappy. The fruits of the Spirit of God are love, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost; and the man that says he loves God and hateth his brother, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. I do not care who he may be, or what his name, or where he lives. This is the way I read the Scripture, and the way the Gospel teaches me. "By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another." Even an outside poet has sung:

"Then speak no ill, a kindly word
Can never leave a sting behind," etc.

Let us be governed by these principles, and cleave to everything that is ennobling, that we may be associated together in the bonds of fraternity, love and affection, live our religion, keep God's commandments, and cultivate his holy Spirit, and the spirit of kindness, affection, and love and fraternity among ourselves; so that when we get through with our affairs on this earth, we may meet with joy all those with whom we have associated on the earth below.

God bless the family of Brother Huntington--his wives and children and grandchildren, and all pertaining to him. To his children I would say: follow the example of your father, and God will bless you and save you ultimately with him in his kingdom. And may God help us all to be humble and diligent in keeping his commandments, that we may be saved in his kingdom, in the name of Jesus. Amen.
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His brother, Oliver B. Huntington, was a beekeeper inspector...He named Hobble Creek according to this story:
Interview relating to him by Serena Weight--

He was born in Watertown, New York in October of 1823. Hannah Mendenhall Sanders was born in Wilmington, Delaware in April of 1836. In an interview with my great-aunt Iva Weight Walters (90) on July 10, 1994, she told me about my father’s father’s mother’s father Oliver B. Huntington.
He named Hobble Creek down by Springville, Utah. One night he was up in the canyon with some horses. That night before he went to sleep he hobbled his horses so that they couldn’t go very far. While he was sleeping one of his horses wandered into the creek and somehow lost his hobble. After that he named it Hobble Creek. It’s still named that to this day.
Interview with Iva Waters

Here is a link to O.B. Huntington's journal which can shed more light on Dimick's family...

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://weightfamily.net/FamHist/Pioneers/images/hs3%26pixs/obh.JPG&imgrefurl=http://weightfamily.net/FamHist/Pioneers/weight/huntinob.htm&usg=__ctp-qyusVh2MRLHfKlYyvehby5Q=&h=480&w=640&sz=63&hl=en&start=20&zoom=1&tbnid=HpoZuMiB3pkQOM:&tbnh=103&tbnw=137&ei=3S3uTumXIOHUiALZ7_CwBA&prev=/search%3Fq%3D%2522Oliver%2Bb.%2Bhuntington%2522%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26gbv%3D2%26tbm%3Disch&um=1&itbs=1
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Here is a link to an article that talks about D. B. Huntington being instrumental in helping settle Manti.
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Buried next to Dimick (no headstone?) http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=22501348

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2 Comments:

Blogger Delirious said...

I wrote some more about him on the obhuntington blog.

1/18/2011 12:27 PM  
Blogger Epitome of Sweetness said...

I don't look like anyone. Shouldn't we look like someone?

3/02/2011 9:28 AM  

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